Florida Nurse Practitioner – APRN

October 1, 2018, Florida ARNP becomes APRN.
Governor Scott signed into law House Bill 1337, a new law that will change the term “Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner” to “Advanced Practice Registered Nurse” and further defines advanced practice roles. The new law will move Florida closer to the national standard for APRN title, licensure and recognition of all four APRN roles.

Here’s what’s important to know:

  • While HB1337 doesn’t change practice or alter requirements for licensure, it brings Florida into closer alignment with national standards for nursing regulation. The new language clarifies existing licensure requirements already in practice into Florida law.
  • Currently, advanced practice registered nurses in all four roles are referred to throughout Florida statute as “Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioners.” Updating Florida law to reflect the current modernized title of “Advanced Practice Registered Nurse” ensures consistency with national standards and clarifies a Florida APRN’s ability to use and advertise their title and role as an advanced practice registered nurse.
  • Proper use of title better reflects an APRNs education and training and creates transparency for patients in understanding the credentials of their provider.

From South Florida Council of Advanced Practice Nurses:
The new RN and APRN licenses are scheduled to go out October 8, 2018 and will be issued with the new title.  It will be designated as to if you are a CNS, APRN, CNM, etc. You can practice without any concerns on your current license after October 1 until they get your new one to you. They expect that everyone will have their new license in the mail by October 30th.

Your current APRN license number will remain the same and so will the RN license. It will be something such as RN 1234567; APRN 1234567. Each license will have the same number. If you choose to let your RN license go then you will function as an RN and APRN under the APRN. If you choose to keep it for the Multistate Compact then that is your choice (many educators working on-line programs may need this and if you want to move out of state to a compact state). You may want to consider keeping your RN license because if you are disciplined as an APRN and can’t do those functions, you would still have an RN license to work on—depending on the discipline of course. You do save $50 on the RN license if you keep it.

If you are currently practicing, then you can have both licenses but any new APRN applicants after 10/1/2018 will only be able to apply for the APRN license or RN–both won’t be inclusive as they are now for current licensees. Fees will be the same for the RN and APRN license but will be reduced for the APRN only license if you choose not to do the RN.

Renew Now CE will be happy to work with Advanced Practice Providers who want to keep their RN license active.  Contact us at hello@renewnowce.com for assistance.